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Will “virtual visitation” be a part of your child custody plan?

Our readers in Maryland who are going through a child custody dispute in the family law courts understand how important this issue can be to the overall good of the children and the parents involved.

In many cases, both parents want what is right for the child in question, but they disagree on what that is. So, some situations call for creative solutions. “Virtual visitation” may be part of that solution.

Will “virtual visitation” be a part of your child custody plan? Well, that depends on any given family situation. For those who don’t know, “virtual visitation” refers to the ability, through today’s modern technology, for parents and their children to interact online, either via texting and messaging apps, or even with video calling programs. The parent and child aren’t in the same place at the same time, but the interaction is occurring anyway and can be a great way for the child and parent to connect.

Some people may think that virtual visitation will only come up in those cases in which the parent in question and the child live far away from each other, but that isn’t the case. Sometimes, schedules simply do not line up for parents and children to spend in-person time together as much as they would like, even when they live in the same town. But, through virtual visitation rights, they can still maintain their relationship.

Virtual visitation, if it is used, is oftentimes just one component of a child custody plan. Getting the right plan in place that is in the best interests of the child is the family law court’s primary objective.