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What should you do with your marital home for your divorce?

While you get used to no longer remaining in a marriage with your current spouse, you must also face the reality that you may soon move out of your marital home in Maryland. Do you know your options regarding keeping or giving up the home and which choice makes sense?

U.S. News & World Report explains how divorcing spouses deal with their marital home. Determine whether to fight for your marital home or look for a new residence.

Remain in the house together

If you and your current spouse share children, the two of you could “nest” in the residence together. That means that the kids remain in the house while the parents take turns remaining in the marital home and living in a shared apartment. Nesting can provide shared children with solidarity while the parents have time apart from each other. Nesting often only makes for a solid short-term strategy until the parents either decide that one of them should buy the house or that they should sell it together.

Put the home on the market

While you and your soon-to-be-ex-spouse may want to sell your marital home, the local housing market could be in a rut. Or perhaps you want to live in the house together for the sake of your kids. Under both circumstances, remaining on the property and selling it later could be the most favorable move.

Decide if you can afford the house by yourself

If your current spouse does not mind you keeping the house alone, can you afford the upkeep and bills on your current salary? Even if alimony payments help you with housing costs, that extra income may not last for the rest of your life.

Divorce comes with several tough choices to make. With all of them, proper knowledge helps parties make the right decision.